Top 6 Foods That Can Help Boost Your Vitamin D Levels

Top 6 Foods That Can Help Boost Your Vitamin D Levels

Like all the other vitamins, vitamin D or commonly called the “sunshine vitamin” is extremely important for your overall health. Vitamin D is a critical fat-soluble vitamin that is needed by the human body to maintain serum calcium, which supports the cellular processes, neuromuscular function and bone density. Vitamin D helps in regulating the cellular growth and reduces the systematic redness and swelling in the body. It further promotes calcium absorption in the body, which leads to the development of stronger bones. Vitamin D also plays an important role in the immune response and is essential for the weight management, prevention of osteoporosis, cancer, fighting depression; enhance brain function, boosting immunity and diabetes.

lt7chrro

Like all the other vitamins, vitamin D or commonly called the “sunshine vitamin” is extremely important for your overall health.
Photo Credit: iStock

Also read: Vitamin B3: Healthy Benefits And Foods That Are Rich In Vitamin B3

Some of the common symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are getting sick very often, tiredness, chronic pain the bones, depression, digestive issues, trouble in sleeping, excessive sweating, inflammation and swelling, wounds that do not heal quickly and weak bones. Vitamin D deficiency could lead to serious medical conditions like high blood sugar levels, high blood pressure, brittle bones and even cancer in some severe cases.

6 simple ways to boost your vitamin D levels:

1. Sunshine:

The most simple and an effective way to get vitamin D is spending some time in the sun. Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because our bodies can actually absorb vitamin D from exposure to the sun. Adequate sun exposure can be really helpful to boost your vitamin D intake.

2. Mushrooms:

Extremely healthy and a delicious source of vitamin

Like all the other vitamins, vitamin D or commonly called the “sunshine vitamin” is extremely important for your overall health. Vitamin D is a critical fat-soluble vitamin that is needed by the human body to maintain serum calcium, which supports the cellular processes, neuromuscular function and bone density. Vitamin D helps in regulating the cellular growth and reduces the systematic redness and swelling in the body. It further promotes calcium absorption in the body, which leads to the development of stronger bones. Vitamin D also plays an important role in the immune response and is essential for the weight management, prevention of osteoporosis, cancer, fighting depression; enhance brain function, boosting immunity and diabetes.

lt7chrro

Like all the other vitamins, vitamin D or commonly called the “sunshine vitamin” is extremely important for your overall health.
Photo Credit: iStock

Also read: Vitamin B3: Healthy Benefits And Foods That Are Rich In Vitamin B3

Some of the common symptoms of vitamin D deficiency are getting sick very often, tiredness, chronic pain the bones, depression, digestive issues, trouble in sleeping, excessive sweating, inflammation and swelling, wounds that do not heal quickly and weak bones. Vitamin D deficiency could lead to serious medical conditions like high blood sugar levels, high blood pressure, brittle bones and even cancer in some severe cases.

6 simple ways to boost your vitamin D levels:

1. Sunshine:

The most simple and an effective way to get vitamin D is spending some time in the sun. Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because our bodies can actually absorb vitamin D from exposure to the sun. Adequate sun exposure can be really helpful to boost your vitamin D intake.

2. Mushrooms:

Extremely healthy and a delicious source of vitamin D mushrooms can be easily included in your diet. Mushrooms are also rich in other vitamins like B vitamins and potassium. You can easily include mushrooms in your diet by adding them in your salads, sandwiches, soups and wraps.

3. Egg yolk:

Yet another reason to include eggs in our daily diet! But Vitamin D is found only in the yolk of the egg. Whole eggs in general contain all the essential amino acids and are an excellent source of choline and healthy fats. So, if you are vitamin D deficient, include whole eggs in your early morning breakfast or evening snacks

D mushrooms can be easily included in your diet. Mushrooms are also rich in other vitamins like B vitamins and potassium. You can easily include mushrooms in your diet by adding them in your salads, sandwiches, soups and wraps.

3. Egg yolk:

Yet another reason to include eggs in our daily diet! But Vitamin D is found only in the yolk of the egg. Whole eggs in general contain all the essential amino acids and are an excellent source of choline and healthy fats. So, if you are vitamin D deficient, include whole eggs in your early morning breakfast or evening snacks

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After 57 years of technology focus, IIT-Delhi set for a makeover

IIT Delhi campus. Photo: HT

IIT Delhi campus. Photo: HT

New Delhi: After nearly six decades of technology focus, the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi (IIT-D) is set for a makeover – it will become a comprehensive multidisciplinary university.

Medical science, bio medical studies, public policy, design thinking, sustainability studies, executive education and non-degree program will soon find a place at IIT Delhi as it shifts its focus to become more inclusive in its approach.

The IIT announced its bigger plans Monday, days after it was awarded the institute of eminence (IoE) tag by the central government, and said that apart from a multi-disciplinary approach in education and research, it would be market-driven like IIMs to raise funds to fulfil its bigger makeover.

“We will branch out and do more of what we have not done yet. The financial plan is ready — we shall raise around Rs.1500 crore from our R&D work for achieving the target,” said V. Ramgopal Rao, director of IIT-Delhi.

By a conservative estimate, IIT-Delhi will be spending Rs 2500 crore including the Rs 1,000 crore IoE grant in enhancing its research facilities, physical infrastructure and outreach in the next five years, the IIT said.

Rao said from 2019, its new public policy school will admit students at masters and doctorate level, its design school will admit at undergraduate and postgraduate level. It is starting doctorate courses with All India Institute of Medical Science in number of areas.

Advance computational systems including artificial intelligence and block-chain, biological and health-care systems, energy and environment, smart and sustainable infrastructure and habitat will be its new focus for developing excellence, the director said. He said they are investing Rs. 200 crore for a bio-research park in IIT-Delhi’s upcoming satellite campus in Jhajjhar in Haryana, and AIIMS will be partner for that as well.

Other than degree programs, the IIT said it will have short term courses like diplomas to cater to the need of the industry at large and such courses will be market driven and charged at market rates. For example, one year diploma in AI will cost around Rs.10 lakhs, more than three times the fee an IIT charges for its flagship four-year B-Tech courses.

“Customised courses at post graduate and diploma level will have market rates and we know with industry hubs around Delhi NCR, the demands will be significant,” said Sanjeev Sanghi, dean alumni and international programs at IIT-D.

The institute said, since they will be able to raise a lot of money from their internal resources including research, they will offer fellowships to attract foreign students to the campus and may offer enough salary to eager foreign professors to join IIT Delhi.

The institute has told the human resource development ministry to be in the top 100 global universities up from 172 right now in the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University rankings and in nine years they will be in top 50. Rao said, in 2017 despite their 172 position, they got zero marks in faculty-student ratio and international students. QS is an international ranking agency based in Britain. “We are making a structured effort to remove the shortcomings and you will see the difference gradually,” said M. Balakrishnan, deputy director IIT Delhi.

Balakrishnan said to enhance foreign students presence, they will focus on certain catchment countries and tie up with top universities for joint post-graduate and doctorate courses. “In next few months, you will see joint programs with top universities of Singapore, Taiwan, Australia etc. As part of this, you will see foreign students coming and staying here. At PhD level, we are looking at 1000 foreign scholars at IIT-D campus in next five years,” Rao added.

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Teachers Protest Against ‘Government Apathy Towards Issues Concerning Education’

Teachers Protest Against 'Government Apathy Towards Issues Concerning Education'

Teachers of Delhi University gathered at Parliament Street today under the banner of DUTA to protest against what they called ‘the complete apathy of the MHRD towards the issues concerning teachers not only of DU but affecting universities across the country’.

“Teachers are particularly exercised over the failure of the MHRD to implement revised allowances and pensions, consequent to the VII Pay Revision, and disbursal of the required funds for its implementation,” DUTA president Rajib Ray said in a statement.

The Delhi University Teachers Association or DUTA has also said that thousands of teachers and employees have been denied pension altogether because the MHRD (Ministry of Human Resource Development) has failed to release funds for those in option and third category and embroiled the rest in an endless legal battle through an SLP filed at its insistence.

“The appointment process is at a halt and the regularisation of thousands of ad-hoc teachers is dependent on the withdrawal of the 5 March 2018 UGC letter asking for implementation of department/subject wise reservation roster and the subsequent freeze on appointments,” said the DUTA.

The teachers, in their protest, demanded the Government to initiate immediate steps to promulgate an Ordinance in the upcoming session of Parliament so that the appointments can begin immediately.

The teachers also called the Tripartite MoU, replacing grants by loans through HEFA, Graded Autonomy and Categorisation of Universities as ‘relentless policy attacks on higher education that will fundamentally change the character, content and reach of public-funded education in the country’.

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Apple Launches Free Coding Education Program For Students

Apple Launches Free Coding Education Program For Students

Apple said Monday it will offer new resources to open thousands of free “Hour of Code” sessions at its Apple Store facilities across the world to bring coding education to students. The Cupertino, California-based company said customers can register for coding education, made available through the Everyone Can Code programme, at the Apple Store locations from Dec. 1 through Dec 14, Xinhua news agency reported.

For the sixth year, Apple said it will host Hour of Code daily coding sessions through Today at Apple, which will provide opportunities for people at a variety of skill levels to learn coding.

Kids Hour sessions will help children aged six to 12 explore coding with robots, while those aged 12 and above can attend sessions using Swift Playgrounds and iPad to learn coding concepts, Apple said.

The sessions are part of Apple’s several programmes being unveiled to help more people learn coding skills both inside and outside the classroom.

Also on Monday, Apple encouraged teachers to attend its Computer Science Education Week, an educational campaign scheduled for early December to introduce computer science and coding to K-12 students.

Apple created a new Hour of Code Facilitator Guide to help teachers conduct in-classroom education by using Swift Playgrounds and other iPad apps.

For coding education outside of the classroom, Apple’s new Swift Coding Club kit gives teachers, students and club mentors the tools they need to start their own coding clubs.

The kit, designed for students aged eight years or old, will build their ability to collaborate, prototype apps and how to code an app.

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Pondicherry University Professor Receives Woman Scientist Award

Pondicherry University Professor Receives Woman Scientist Award

Dr R Rukkumani, a faculty in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Pondicherry University, received the prestigious ‘Woman Scientist Award’ by Biotechnology Research Society of India (BRSI). Vice Chancellor of Pondicherry University, Prof. Gurmeet Singh appreciated Dr Rukkumani for her achievement.

Among several nominations from different Universities, Research Institutes and Industries, she has been chosen for the award. The award includes, certificate, shield, citation and a cash prize of Rs. 25,000/-.

The award was given to her in the recently held 15th BRSI Convention and the International conference on Innovation for Bio Sustainable development held in Hyderabad.

The award was presented to her by the Director General of CSIR, Prof Shekhar C Mande in the presence of Directors of seven CSIR Research institutes.

Dr. Rukkumani has been working in the field of cancer Biology and her Molecular Medicine Research laboratory constantly works to find efficient therapeutics for cancer.

She has identified an efficient anticancer molecule from a natural source and has filed a patent for the same, said a statement from the University.

She is working on drug repurposing and nano targeted therapies for treating metastatic cancer.

She has also received awards like ‘Scientific excellence- Senior award’ by Biozone Research Technologies and ‘Outstanding Women in Science award’ by Centre for Advanced Research and Design, Venus International foundation, Renato Dulbecco Memorial Award by II World Cancer Congress  and ‘Best Teacher award’ from Pondicherry University the year 2018 .

She has published more than 60 International research papers and has obtained five projects from various funding agencies on Cancer.

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IIM Ahmedabad Hosts Varun Gandhi

IIM Ahmedabad Hosts Varun Gandhi

On Friday, November 30, 2018, Feroze Varun Gandhi, Member of Parliament, delivered a lecture at IIM Ahmedabad, at an event organised by the Public Policy Students Club of the Institute. The lecture was attended by around 100 people including students from the PGPM, Food and Agribusiness Management (FABM) and Armed Forces Programmes besides staff and some faculty members.

At the session in IIMA, he also released his new book ‘A Rural Manifesto: Realising India’s Future Through her Villages’.

The talk was a peek into Mr Gandhi’s 2.5 years of research that goes behind the book, fondly referred to as ‘the unreadably dense volume’ by the author.

He gave succinct examples from his experiences, both urban and rural, to highlight the inequalities prevalent in the Indian society currently.

He discussed how ‘privilege perpetuates privilege’ and how technology has the potential to act as an equaliser, if used well.

‘A Day At IIMA’: An Initiative That Offers A Glimpse Of Student Life At Top B-School

He spoke in detail about possible political reforms that would help strengthen India’s democratic governance, such as parliamentary addressal of public petitions, need for addressing electoral corruption and strengthening the parliamentary discussion process on passing laws.

Among other things, he also talked about grassroot innovations in the rural economy.

Former President Pranab Mukherjee Begins Lecture Series At IIM Ahmedabad

“The talk was highly insightful and displayed various facets of the problem in the agriculture sector in India. Encompassing a mix of academic as well as practical knowledge, Mr Gandhi focused on the growing inequality in the country leading to an increase in inequity in the society as well,” said second year PGP student and coordinator of the Public Policy Club, Aditya Govil.

“The premises that a change in the country’s systems and institutions is related to the way politics is run in this country was well brought out through a series of examples in modern day India. Mr. Gandhi stressed upon the fact that the future of the country is in the hands of young, bright minds and narrated incidents from all across India that suggested this,” Govil added.

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GATE 2019: List Of Rejected Candidates Released, Check Here

GATE 2019: List Of Rejected Candidates Released, Check Here

The details of candidates whose GATE 2019 applications rejected by the IIT Madras have been released on the official website of the competitive exam. The rejected list have been published the website include two types of candidates; those who are found to be duplicate and those who are not meeting eligibility requirements. The official lists said, as already announced in the GATE 2019 brochure, no admit card will be generated and no application fee will be refunded for these candidates.

However , in case, if any of these candidates whose registrations have been rejected, would like to submit the required documents, they may contact the exam conducting agency.

IIT Madras has also released the list of enrollment IDs of candidates whose applications are provisionally only accepted. About these candidates, the notification said the examination results of these applicants will be withheld unless the defects are rectified by February 15, 2019.

“If a candidate makes more than one application for the same paper, he/she will be allowed to appear in any one session ONLY. One of the duplicate/triplicate applications will be considered and the remaining applications will be rejected without any refund of application fee,” said the official brochure of GATE 2019.

The rejected and ‘provisionally only accepted’ list can be accessed from the official website, gate.iitm.ac.in.

IIT Madras will conduct the exam next year in February, 2019 in forenoon and afternoon session. The exam will be held in selected cities and towns in the country as well as at Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Colombo (Sri Lanka), Dhaka (Bangladesh), Dubai (UAE), Kathmandu (Nepal) and Singapore. GATE is conducted every year, for granting admission to M.Tech. and PhD programs offered at IITs and IISc. In addition to this GATE scores are also used by several PSUs for recruitment purpose.

GATE is conducted jointly by the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore and the seven Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT) at Bombay, Delhi, Guwahati, Kanpur, Kharagpur, Madras and Roorkee.

Qualifying in GATE is a mandatory requirement for seeking admission and or financial assistance to Master’s programs and direct Doctoral programs in Engineering/Technology/Architecture and Doctoral programs in relevant branches of Science, in the institutions supported by the MHRD and other Government agencies.

Even in some colleges and institutions, which admit students without MHRD scholarship/assistantship, the GATE qualification is mandatory.

Apart from educational institutes, many Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) have been using the GATE score in their recruitment process.

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Nutrition Programmes, Education May Help Lower Anaemia In India

Nutrition Programmes, Education May Help Lower Anaemia In India

According to a study published in the BMJ Global Health Journal, improved public health and nutrition programmes for children under five years of age, and higher education and wealth among expectant mothers substantially contributed to lowering anaemia among these two groups between the years 2006 and 2016. As per the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Anaemia reduction among teenage girls and women under 50 years of age, however, showed minimal progress. More than half of the population of women and children in India is anaemic and is, therefore, currently experiencing reduced quality of life in various respects, which includes work capacity, fatigue, cognitive function, birth outcomes and child development.

According to the researchers, in addition to describing the problem, showing slow improvements, and showing high variability between different states, their paper identifies drivers of anaemia from a broad set of potential drivers at various levels. Among various drivers, positive changes in mothers’ education, coverage of nutrition and health interventions, socioeconomic status, sanitation and meat and fish consumption contributed to improvement in the haemoglobin count – low haemoglobin count indicates anaemia – among both children and pregnant women during 2006-16.

Better education alone accounted for nearly one-fourth of the improvement seen in the haemoglobin count among expectant mothers, and one-tenth in children. The researchers said that further improvements in these common drivers can substantially impact maternal and child anaemia, simultaneously bringing down anaemia prevalence across the country in these two groups.

Haemoglobin and anaemia improved significantly among children less than five years; and pregnant women 15-49 years old, but not in the non-pregnant women in the same age group between 2006 and 2016. Anaemia declined by 11 percentage points among children (70 per cent in 2006 to 59 per cent in 2016), 7.6 percentage points among expectant mothers (58 per cent to 50.4 per cent), and a mere 2.1 percentage points in teenage girls and women under 50 (55 per cent to 52.9 per cent).

The researchers claimed that no progress has been made in reducing anaemia among non-pregnant adult women in India in the last decade. Most programmes have not focused on this group but, instead, have focused on pregnant women and young children.

India’s recently launched Anaemia Mukt Bharat initiative puts the focus on women of reproductive age (20-49 years), who will start receiving weekly iron-folic acid supplementation, which supports the finding on the need to attend to this population segment. In addition, the Centre has mandated the fortification of salt with iodine and iron, and wheat flour with iron, folic acid and Vitamin B-12.

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Teacher Education Programme For Class 12 Pass Students

Teacher Education Programme For Class 12 Pass Students 

National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE) has announced Integrated Teacher Education Programme or ITEP with a view to enhance the teacher education system in the country. The programme which will nurture class 12 pass students for a committed and a responsible profession. The course will be of four years. Enrolled under this programme, students shall have to complete it within eight semesters or in other case can complete the programme within a maximum period of 6 years.

Those with minimum 50 per cent marks in the class 12 exam are eligible to apply. The admission will be on merit basis. As per the policy of the University or State Government or Union Territory Administration there can also be an entrance exam for granting admission to this course.

The classes for students enrolled in the ITEP course will begin in 2019.

As of now, NCTE is yet to decide the composite institutions for the course. Institutions that wish to offer the course, for the first academic year 2019-2023 of ITEP course, can go through the eligibility norms set by the Council and submit their applications from December 3 to 31 for the grant of permission or recognition.

Initially, the programme will only be offered in Science and Arts streams.

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Board Exam 2019: A Two-Month Preparation Strategy

Board Exam 2019: A Two-Month Preparation Strategy

The Board exams, including of prominent boards like CBSE, CISCE and various state boards, will begin from next February. As we enter December, the students who are getting ready to appear for both Class 10 and Class 12 annual exams, they are left with two months preparation time. As we do in every major step we take in our life, preparation strategies are pivotal for career-deciding examinations like Class 10 and Class 12. “Some strategies can help you maximise your preparation. Cardinal among that, is better time management – an important skill to have for every student but is essential for board students, especially those preparing for competitive exams,” says Prateek Bhargava, Founder and CEO of Mindler.

“Without this, most effort gets wasted. Here is a primer on how to organise yourself for a better preparation for the last two months before exams,” he adds.

To ensure that there are no last-minute hassles and you score well, you need to make a separate timetable to study every day in last 2 months before board exam.

Here are some tips that could help you manage your time better as suggested by Mr Bhargava:

Plan your day well: 

It is important to identify subjects/ concepts you struggle with. Revisiting them shall give you more significant insights, and more clarity, and help you fare better.

However, you should also keep your stronger areas in check, through regular practice. Revisit the basics – they’re essential and make sure you go through examples, and illustrations.

Subject-Wise Preparation Tips For CBSE Class 10 Board Exam

Clear all your doubts

Make sure you get your doubts cleared by your teachers or your friends in advance of any revisional schedule. You must have a regular interaction with your teachers to do the same.

Write mock exams

Solving mock papers and previous years’ sample papers will not only help in providing much-needed practice but will also acquaint you with different questions that can be asked in the real exam.

There are two key aspects, to practising mocks:

Replicate the exam-like environment: It’s essential that you attempt your mocks like you would attempt the real exam. Take no/minimal breaks and keep yourself away from distractions while writing a mock exam. Also attempt your mock between 10:30 AM – 1:30 PM (the board exam time), so that you get used to the timing and can focus more during those hours.

Don’t overdo them: Writing mock exams enables one to do systematic practice and identify concepts/areas that need a little more revision. However, it is not recommended for you to go overboard with mock papers. If you’ve done your syllabus, and are just looking to revise, attempt 2 mocks a day. If you’re still preparing, attempting one mock a day is enough.

Andhra Pradesh: Intermediate (Class 12) Board Exam In February-March 2019

Pomodoro Technique

Set a timer to twenty-five minutes when you focus on your studies and when the timer rings take a five minutes break and then set the timer again. The small breaks in the middle help in relaxing and motivating you.

Revise what you’re not confident about

The concepts that you have just read through need to be prioritized during revision. Learn those topics and strengthen your understanding of it. Visual aids can be helpful while revising. With two months left for the exam, condense revision noted into one-page diagrams. This will help you recall everything you need to know during the exam.

Bihar Board Exams In February 2019; Date Sheet Released

Take care of yourself

You can only perform if you’re mentally and physically healthy. Don’t let the exam pressure get to you. Get at least 6 hours of sleep every day, and have healthy, balanced meals. It is recommended that you take regular breaks between your studies and keep yourself happy.

A good score in board exams helps you to take your preferred course in the next stages and proceed to your dream career. All the preparation tips mentioned above are sure to help you prepare well for the Board Exam in 2019.

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